Book Review: The Nightly Disease by Max Booth III

© Darkfuse, 2017.

 

I really don’t know how I feel about Max Booth III’s The Nightly Disease. Published initially as a serial in DarkFuse’s magazine, The Nightly Disease follows a hotel night auditor’s descent into madness as everything that can go wrong, does go wrong. In a series of darkly comedic and horrific events, the reader joins Isaac on a crazy ride, rife with some of the most outrageous occurrences a person could encounter.

Single, living alone, and working a job where he knows he’ll go nowhere, Isaac spends most of his nights between running the audit and preparing breakfast with his nose in a book, watching Netflix, or rubbing one out on the roof of the hotel he works at. He has a clear disdain for his job and spares no love for the guests that stay at his hotel, which all appear to be exceptionally rude (not that he’s any better). After he finds a wallet and decides to keep it, things escalate quickly and soon he is hiding bodies while trying to appease his invisible companions, Chowls and Owlbert.

I think what throws me off the most about this book is that it can be a bit difficult to follow at times. As Isaac loses his mind, the writing takes on a more frantic, senseless air that seriously messed with me reading it – to the point I almost put it down. It wasn’t a bad book, by any means. In fact, I think there’s a lot to be said about the fact that I felt like I was losing my mind reading it; Isaac’s perspective is extremely well-written.

Overall, I did not care that much for The Nightly Disease. It was nice to be able to identify with the main character to some degree – if only because I work the night audit shift at a hotel myself, and most hotels seem to work pretty much the same way. Other than that, I prefer books with a lot more depth and a bit more of a serious tone. While The Nightly Disease wasn’t really something I’m into, I definitely plan to look into Max Booth III’s other books. His writing style is great.

I would like to thank NetGalley and DarkFuse for providing me with an advance copy in exchange for an honest review.

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